A Growing Collection of English Novel Studies for Young Learners from Spanish Countries

josh-applegate-149609

“Mommmmmmmmmmmmmm! Do we have any pancakes?”

Done! These days I’ve been busy uploading novel studies from the Nate the Great series to my Teachers Pay Teachers store (fifteen so far). They are meant to be used with children learning English whose first language is Spanish. (Click on any of the images below to check them out). If you’ve ever visited my blog or store before you’ll know that I’ve had similar products in KoreanJapanese, and Arabic for a while now. The time seemed right to add a Spanish selection, which has probably got you wondering…

¿Hablas español?


Alas, no. Growing up in Canada I spent my school years in French immersion schools, also learning a touch of now forgotten German, and of course fifteen years acquiring Korean. The only Spanish I’ve ever known were the bits and pieces I occasionally picked up from watching Sesame Street and The Three Amigos as a child. Which is why it was so interesting to work on a translation project with two fellow foreign residents originally hailing from Venezuela and Columbia respectfully, also raising families here in South Korea. Spanish is awesome to listen to.

Slide1

Anyway, the booklets are very simple to use and are pretty moderately priced considering their usefulness and longevity. As for their contents, while reading a novel what are you going to want? Well, most teachers are going to need comprehension questions, probably some writing prompts related to the story, some quizzes, and maybe some projects, right? Ok, so these booklets will have you covered there, and then some. They also come with lists of key vocabulary words and their translations, which are also incorporated into the quizzes and final test. (Click here to check out my whole catalog of English novel studies for Spanish speakers.)

Whoa! Is including the students’ L1 really a good use of class time? Shouldn’t the children interpret the meaning of the text on their own? In my opinion, the answer to that question is a qualified yes and no. Obviously, we don’t want the students translating every word of the text. What would be the point of reading in English? But, in my experience, a few select translations can make the difference between a student understanding maybe 50% of the text and having a firm grasp of about 90% of it. It has worked for me. I bet it will help your students as well.

Slide3Slide4Slide5Slide6Slide7Slide8Slide9Slide10
Another reason I insist on providing translations is that some of my cleverest students will look up words at home whether I want them to or not – or maybe their parents will – with mixed results. Confronted with eight possible meanings, they more often than not choose the wrong one, confusing themselves in the process. At least this way I can ensure everyone is on the same page and don’t think duck means pato when it’s actually supposed to mean esquivar.

I’ll be adding new titles every month so come back often and check to see what’s available, or better yet click the green star at my store and get updates by email. I’m also looking for suggestions of new books to read. And if you do try something out and like it, please don’t forget to write a comment or two and earn yourself some TpT credits.

Remember, the first chapter of all my novel studies are available for free. I always want customers to know exactly what they’re getting. No surprises or catches. Anyway, that’s all for now.

Adiós

Slide4Slide5Slide6Slide7Slide8Slide9Slide10

Hundreds of Pages of Worksheets to help You Teach Let’s Go 3 Better!

LG3 Worksheets Bundle (Sample)

I’ve been using Let’s Go 3 to teach English here in South Korea since it was in its second edition (it’s now in its 4th) and have never really had any complaints except that there just weren’t enough ready made materials to use in my lessons. Don’t get me wrong, when inspired I could be pretty creative in my activity planning and come up with lesson plans that were both entertaining and productive. But sometimes I just needed simple practice games and worksheets – stuff that OUP didn’t have enough of.

Well, this month I completed my 2017 update to my Let’s Go 3 worksheet bundle and it is now available at my TpT store. At more than 1200 pages of worksheets, games, and teaching tips – it’s a valuable teacher’s toolbox that will save you loads of time with piles of no-prep activities.

There are piles of vocabulary practice sheets:

Slide16Slide17Slide18

Slide19

Writing worksheets of various types:

Slide21Slide22Slide23Slide24

And lots of games you can print out whenever you’re short on time:

Slide27

Slide91

Slide60It’s also growing. I’m steadily adding more teaching tips and videos to populate the dark corners of the coursebook with more interesting things to do. This particular bundle has more than doubled in size since I first started selling it because as I teach it I’m always figuring out other useful things to add to it. And the updates are always free.

Check it out.

Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, an English Novel Study for Korean, Japanese, or Spanish Speakers

Image result for junie b jones

Who would have thought that a children’s novel could generate such controversy as Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, but the world is what it is. I’ve read the comments of some teachers who insist that Junie B. (NEVER forget the B!) is a poor role model for children, what with her penchant for casual violence and all, and should thus be banished from the classroom. Her adventures would, I admit, inspire horror in the hearts of the average primary school teacher – but is that any reason to write her off completely? 

I don’t think so. You see I enjoy using the book as a cautionary tale. Most of the children I teach all know somebody like Junie B. whom they avoid as much as possible; we have quite active discussions actually.

So, if you’re like me and enjoy a little rough housing in your children’s literature then please check out one of the novel studies below at my TpT store. They’ve been designed for teaching to EFL students who share the same mother tongue: Korean, Japanese, or Spanish (other languages are in the works).

Just click on one of the images below:

Junie B. Jones (Korean)Junie B. Jones (Japanese) 

Nate the Great and the Mushy Valentine, an ELT Study for Arabic, Korean, Japanese, and Spanish Speaking Young Learners

It’s Valentines Day. You discover that your pet dog has a secret admirer. You start to freak out.

“Hey this is MY dog. Why should I have to compete for his affection? That’s why he’s MY dog in the first place. So I can have someone’s unconditional affection!”

That is the situation that super-sleuth Nate the Great finds himself in one morning in this short novel, perfect for celebrating that holiday dreaded by singles, couples, and married folk across the globe – Nate the Great and the Mushy Valentine. 

A novel study for this book is now available for young learners whose mother tongue is one of four languages: Arabic, Japanese, Korean, or Spanish.

For more focused and useful lessons, it divides the novel into three easy to teach sections:

  • Section 1: p.7-21
  • Section 2: p.22-33
  • Section 3: p.34-44

Each section includes:

  • comprehension questions about the story with space for students to answer in full sentences;
  • a creative writing assignment where students can express their opinions about topics related to the text;
  • a vocabulary list with Korean translations of key words to save on dictionary time and reduce confusion about meaning;
  • a word search puzzle for students to enjoy some quiet time to familiarize themselves with the vocabulary;
  • a sequencing worksheet where students can identify the different components of the story; and
  • a chapter quiz so you can assess your students’ comprehension of the text and vocabulary.

There is also:

  • a crossword puzzle;
  • a clue log;
  • a make-your-own word search puzzle worksheet;
  • a make-your-own crossword puzzle worksheet;
  • a comic strip project;
  • an illustrator worksheet;
  • a summarizer worksheet;
  • a prediction worksheet;
  • a final test;
  • a book cover project;
  • a book report assignment; and
  • answer keys.

Click on one of the images below to se for yourself.




Christmas in Camelot, an ESL/EFL Novel Study for Korean Students

Jack and Annie find themselves in Camelot for Christmas where they are sent on an important quest to save the kingdom. Will they succeed? Read Christmas in Camelot with your young learners to find out!

I know. It was getting onto Christmas time and you thought a Christmas chapter book from the Magic Tree House would be a great idea. That, or you were ordered to teach it from on high. You crack open the book and realize what you should have known before. At 16 chapters it’s longer than you expected, and the vocabulary is a bit more difficult than previous books in the series. You suddenly feel that you’re in trouble, big trouble. How on earth will you cope?

Never fear, The ESL Review is here with a novel study designed for use in the EFL classroom.  It comes with all the basic worksheets, handouts, vocabulary lists, and tests that you will need to teach the book effectively in your class. It will also free up your time so that you can work on the really special parts of your lesson that you know best.

Check it out.

A Growing Collection of ESL/EFL Nate the Great Novel Studies for Japanese Students

If you’re not in the know, Nate The Great is a pancake-loving, child super sleuth in the business of retrieving everyday items that have gone missing from his neighborhood. Supported by his pet dog and assistant Sludge, Nate and his motley crew of friends are entertaining for both children and adults.

I’ve recently combined my entire collection of Nate the Great novel studies into a single file that can be downloaded in one go. That’s fifteen out of a total of twenty-six novels, with more than one thousand pages of teaching supplements. At the price I’m charging it’s the equivalent of paying for ten books and getting five for free (as well as each of the remaining books that I’ll be adding over the next year).

You can see which titles are available below. Some are missing, but if you leave a message at my store or in the comments section below I’ll get to work on the book you need right away.

The novel studies below have been designed for use with students whose first language is Japanese, but this same bundle is available for Arabic, Korean, and Spanish speaking students. Click on any of the images below to check it out.




Nate the Great and the Crunchy Christmas, an ESL/EFL Novel Study for Japanese Students 


Can Nate the Great find Fang the dog’s missing Christmas card before he begins to doubt his mother’s love? Read Nate the Great and the Crunchy Christmas with your young learners to find out! 

This English novel study is designed specifically for use in the ESL/EFL classroom with Japanese speaking young learners in mind. Meticulously crafted and easy to use for both teachers and students, this comprehensive booklet will absolutely enhance your teaching experience. It’s classroom tested, and it works.

(This novel study is also available for Korean and Spanish speakers. Arabic will also be available soon.)

For more focused and useful lessons, it divides the novel into four easy to teach sections: 

  • Section 1: p.1-11
  • Section 2: p.12-21
  • Section 3: p.22-31
  • Section 4: p.32-41

Each section includes:

  • comprehension questions about the story with space for students to answer in full sentences;
  • a creative writing assignment where students can express their opinions about topics related to the text;
  • a vocabulary list with Japanese translations of key words to save on dictionary time and reduce confusion about meaning;
  • a word search puzzle for students to enjoy some quiet time to familiarize themselves with the vocabulary;
  • a sequencing worksheet where students can identify the different components of the story; and
  • a chapter quiz so you can assess your students’ comprehension of the text and vocabulary.

There are also: 

  • student handouts;
  • a crossword puzzle;
  • a make-your-own word search puzzle worksheet;
  • a make-your-own crossword puzzle worksheet;
  • a comic strip project;
  • an illustrator worksheet;
  • a summarizer worksheet;
  • a prediction worksheet;
  • a final test; 
  • a book cover project;
  • a book report assignment;
  • answer keys.

The best thing is that this novel study unit is still growing! Once purchased, all updates are FREE! Before deciding whether to buy this product check out this amazing bundle and save $$$!

Nate the Great and the Sticky Case, an ELT Novel Study for Spanish Speakers

05-nate-the-great-and-the-sticky-case-spanish

Will Nate the Great ever find Claude’s missing dinosaur? Read Nate the Great and the Sticky Case to find out! 

This English novel study is designed specifically for use in the ESL/EFL classroom with Spanish speaking young learners in mind. Meticulously crafted and easy to use for both teachers and students, this comprehensive booklet will absolutely enhance your teaching experience. It’s classroom tested, and it works.

This novel study is also available for students whose first language is Japanese or Korean.

For more focused and useful lessons, it divides the novel into four easy to teach sections:

  • Section 1: p.7-17
  • Section 2: p.18-27
  • Section 3: p.28-37
  • Section 4: p.38-48

Each section includes:

  • comprehension questions about the story with space for students to answer in full sentences;
  • a creative writing assignment where students can express their opinions about topics related to the text;
  • a vocabulary list with Spanish translations of key words to save on dictionary time and reduce confusion about meaning;
  • a word search puzzle for students to enjoy some quiet time to familiarize themselves with the vocabulary;
  • a sequencing worksheet where students can identify the different components of the story; and
  • a chapter quiz so you can assess your students’ comprehension of the text and vocabulary.

There are also:

  • crossword puzzles;
  • a clue log;
  • a make-your-own word search puzzle worksheet;
  • a make-your-own crossword puzzle worksheet;
  • a comic strip project;
  • an illustrator worksheet;
  • a summarizer worksheet;
  • a prediction worksheet;
  • a final test;
  • a book cover project; and
  • a book report assignment.

Magic Tree House #30: Haunted Castle on Hallows Eve, a Halloween-Themed ESL/EFL Novel Study for Korean Speakers

If you are into teaching the Magic Tree House series to your young learners you will love volume 30, Haunted Castle on Hallows Eve, this Halloween. In this novel, Jack and Annie must find the Diamond of Destiny and save the mystical land of Camelot from the evil Raven King. It’s an exciting adventure that will keep both you and your students enthralled from beginning to end. 

The ESL Review has designed a novel study booklet perfect for students whose first language is Korean. It includes:

– comprehension questions about the story with space for students to answer in full sentences;

– a creative writing assignment where students can express their opinions about topics related to the text;

– a vocabulary list with Korean translations of key words to save on dictionary time and reduce confusion about meaning;

– a word search puzzle for students to enjoy some quiet time to familiarize themselves with the vocabulary;

– a sequencing worksheet where students can identify the different components of the story; and

– a chapter quiz so you can assess your students’ comprehension of the text and vocabulary.
There is also: 

– a comic strip worksheet;

– a vocabulary list;

– a summarizer worksheet;

– an illustrator worksheet;

– a make your own word search puzzle worksheet;

– a whole book crossword puzzle

– a make your own crossword puzzle worksheet;

– a making predictions worksheet;

– a final test with answer key;

– a book cover project; and

– a book report assignment.

This novel study booklet is also available in Spanish and Japanese. 

Nate the Great and the Halloween Hunt, an ESL/EFL Novel Study for Japanese, Korean, or Spanish Speakers

Here’s a scenario: Halloween is fast on its way and you need to teach a spooky book with your ESL/EFL students. You’re not sure what to do. Well, why not spend the holiday reading Nate the Great and the Halloween Hunt with your young learners? This children’s thriller will keep you on your toes as young super-sleuth Nate seeks out a lost cat on the scariest day of the year.

You might also want to think about trying The ESL Review’s novel study for this book. It has been expressly designed for teaching Nate the Great and the Hallloween Hunt to young learners whose first language is something other than English – like Japanese, Korean, or Spanish.

It’s classroom tested, and it works.